Posted by: spickering | October 21, 2006

Adding A Wireless Laptop To Your Existing Network

It’s simple: On your new laptop click Start>Control Panel. Then click the Network Connections icon. Under “Network Tasks” at the top left side of the page, click Create A New Connection. Follow the wizard, and the Wham, Bam, your in!!

But then, why can you only see “Shared Docs” on the other computer, when, maybe you want to access everything?

I got this information here: http://tech.yahoo.com/gd/sharing-a-hard-drive-over-a-home-network/153494
but I also reprinted it below, just in case that web page ever went away.

Sharing a Hard Drive over a Home Network


This article was excerpted from: Home Networking for Dummies:

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Blog Posts About Wi-Fi & Networking

Home networks commonly share all the folders and files on the hard drives of every computer, but you have to configure the hard drive for sharing. This works differently depending on the version of Windows running on the computer you’re setting up for sharing.

Sharing a hard drive in Windows 98 and Windows Me

When you share a drive in Windows 98 or Windows Me, you also have the opportunity to create permissions for the share (and that’s true for sharing folders, printers, and any other resources). To create a shared hard drive, follow these steps:

1. On the computer you’re sharing, open My Computer.

2. Right-click the hard drive you want to share (usually drive C) and choose Sharing from the shortcut menu that appears.

3. Select the Shared As option.

The options in the dialog box are now available.

4. Type your own name for this share (Windows automatically calls it C) in the Share Name text box, choosing a name such as Den-C for the computer in the den.

5. Configure the Access Type and Passwords.

By default, Windows makes the access type Read-Only, but unless you have a good reason not to, change the access type to Full.

6. Click OK.

You are returned to the My Computer window, where a hand appears under your hard drive icon, indicating that the drive is a shared resource.

Controlling user actions in Windows 98 and Windows Me

Every time you create a share in Windows 98 and Windows Me, you have three choices of access types for that share. The following controls describe what you can do to limit the power of users on your network:

  • Read-Only: Remote users can open and copy documents from the share but can’t make changes to or delete the documents.
  • Full: Remote users can manipulate and use folders and files on your hard drive as though they were working directly at your computer.
  • Depends on Password: The passwords that you create contain one of the access rights. The actions that users can perform depend on the passwords they use. If you choose this option, you must create a password for each type of access.

Remember that if you want to work on your own files from another computer, you’re a remote user just as any other remote user is. You have to know the password to get into your own files.

Sharing a hard drive in Windows 2000

If you’re running Windows 2000, the basic steps for sharing a hard drive are the same as those for Windows 98 and Windows Me, but your options are different. Here’s how to share a drive in Windows 2000:

1. On the computer you’re sharing, open My Computer.

2. Right-click the hard drive you want to share and choose Sharing from the shortcut menu that appears.

3. Select the Share This Folder option.

4. Click the New Share button to create a new share for the drive.

The New Share dialog box opens.

5. Name the share, and optionally, enter a description in the Comment field.

Sharing a hard drive in Windows XP

Sharing a hard drive using Windows XP Home Edition is slightly more complicated than it is on other versions of Windows because Windows XP doesn’t like the idea of sharing a drive. Use the following steps to share a drive:

1. On the computer you’re sharing, open My Computer.

2. Right-click the hard drive you want to share and choose Sharing and Security from the shortcut menu that appears.

The Sharing tab appears, displaying a message that warns you that sharing a drive isn’t a good idea. Beneath the message is a link that you can click to indicate that you understand the risk but want to share the drive. Then the Sharing tab changes to reveal the options that allow you to share the drive.

3. Select the Share This Folder on the Network option.

4. Enter a name for the share.

5. Select the Allow Network Users to Change My Files option.

If you don’t select this option, network users can view files but can’t create new files or modify existing files. Because you’re a network user when you want to work on a file on this computer from a different computer, there’s not much point in restricting what network users can do. However, the security in Windows XP is rather complicated, and it gets more complicated when you share folders.

6. Click OK.

Sharing removable drives

You use the same steps that you used to share a hard drive when you want to share a peripheral (removable) drive. Peripheral drives are considered external to your computer (your hard drive is internal), such as your disk drive, a CD-ROM drive, or a Zip drive.

Trying to set access controls for peripheral drives is foolish because you’d have to spend a lot of time changing the controls, depending on the disk that’s inserted at any given time. The solution is to give full access to peripheral drives and then hide any disks in a locked drawer that you don’t want other users to access.

 

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